1.11.1 Soziolinguistik des Chinesischen

1.11.1 Soziolinguistik des Chinesischen

Einführende Darstellungen


  • Chen, Ping (1999): Modern Chinese: History and Sociolinguistics: Cambridge University Press.
  • Guo Xi (1999): Zhongguo shehui yuyanxue 中国社会语言学. Nanjing: Nanjing Daxue Chubanshe.
  • Li, Yuming 李宇明; Li, Wei 李嵬 (Hg.) (2013): The Language Situation in China. Volume 1. Berlin, Boston: de Gruyter Mouton (Language Policies and Practices in China (LPPC)).
  • Wang, William Shi-yuan (1991): Languages and dialects of China. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press (Journal of Chinese linguistics / Monograph series, 3).

1.11.1.1 Soziolinguistik des Chinesischen


  • Bolton, Kingsley; Kwok, Helen (Hg.) (1992): Sociolinguistics today. International perspectives. London: Routledge.
  • Chen, Yuan (2000): 社会语言学. Shehui yuyanxue. Beijing: Shangwu yinshuguan.
  • Feng, Dezheng William (2019): Analyzing multimodal Chinese discourse Integrating social semiotic and conceptual metaphor theories Feng. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 65–82.
  • Huang, Hen-Hsen; Chen, Hsin-Hsi (2019): Development of computation models for Chinese discourse analysis. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 485–499.
  • Kádár, Dániel Z. (2019): Politeness and impoliteness in Chinese discourse. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 203–215.
  • Khoo, Hui-lu (2019): The dynamics of Southern Min in Taiwan. From Southern Min dialects to “Taigi”. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 596–610.
  • Lai, Huei-ling (2019): An introduction to Taiwan Hakka. Focusing on its sounds, morph-syntax and social background. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 582–595.
  • Lee, Cher Leng (2019): Code-switching in Singapore Mandarin. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 553–568.
  • Qiaoan, Runya (2019): Critical cultural discourse analysis. A case study of Chinese official discourse on civil society. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 643–654.
  • Sharifian, Farzad (Hg.) (2017): Advances in Cultural Linguistics: Springer (Cultural Linguistics).
  • Wakefield, John C. (2019): Studies in Cantonese discourse. Two examples. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 569–581.
  • Wang, Ge (2016): Pains and gains of ethnic multilingual learners in china. An ethnographic case study. Singapore: Springer (Multilingual Education, volume 17).
  • Wang, Jiayi (2019): Chinese business communication. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 325–338.
  • Wang, Vincent X. (2019): Chinese workplace discourse. Politeness strategies and power dynamics. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 339–351.
  • Wang, Wei (2019): Sociolinguistic approaches to Chinese discourse. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 51–64.
  • Wei, Weixiao (2019): Critical analysis of Chinese discourse. Adaptation and transformation. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 36–50.
  • Yang, Jie (2019): Discourse, gender and psychologization in contemporary China. In: Chris Shei (Hg.): The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Discourse Analysis: Routledge, S. 310–322.

1.11.1.2 Einzelaspekte


  • Ayi, Bamo; Harrell, Stevan; Lunzy, Ma (2007): Fieldwork Connections. The Fabric of Ethnographic Collaboration in China and America. Seattle: University of Washington Press. Online verfügbar unter http://gbv.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=3444401.
  • Cheung, Fanny M. (1997): Engendering Hong Kong Society: A Gender Perspective of Women’s Status. Hong Kong: Chinese U. Press.
  • Chiu, Miao-chin (邱妙津) (2000): Chengdaici ‚renjia-de yuyi-ji yuyong yanjiu [稱代詞 ‘人家’的語義及語用研究]. A semantic and pragmatic analysis of the pronominal form of address, renjia. M.A. thesis: National Taiwan Normal University.
  • Davies, Peter (1992): The non-Beijing dialect component in Modern Standard Chinese. In: Kingsley Bolton und Helen Kwok (Hg.): Sociolinguistics today. International perspectives. London: Routledge, S. 192–206.
  • Ettner, Charles (2002): In Chinese, men and women are equal – or – women and men are equal? In: Marlies Hellinger und Hadumod Bußmann (Hg.): Gender Across Languages: The Linguistic Representation of Women and Men, Bd. 2 (2), S. 29–55.
  • Farris, Catherine S. (1992): Chinese preschool codeswitching: Mandarin babytalk and the voice of authority. In: Journal of Multilingual & Multicultural Development (13), S. 187–213.
  • Farris, Catherine S. (1994): A semeiotic analysis of sajiao as a gender marked communication style in Chinese. 1995. In: Marshall Johnson und Fred Y.L Chiu (Hg.): Unbound Taiwan: Closeups from a Distance. Select papers from the International Symposium on Taiwan Studies, 1985-1989, S. 1–29.
  • Flowerdew, John; Li, David; Miller, Lindsay (1998): Attitudes Towards English and Cantonese among Hong Kong Chinese University Lecturers. In: TESOL Quarterly 32 (2), S. 201–231.
  • Groves, Julie M. (2008): Language or Dialect – or Topolect? A Comparison of the Attitudes of Hong Kongers and Mainland Chinese towards the Status of Cantonese. In: Sino-Platonic Papers 179, S. 1–103.
  • Guo, Zhiyan (2014): Young children as intercultural mediators. Mandarin-speaking Chinese families in Britain. Bristol, Buffalo: Multilingual Matters (Languages for Intercultural Communication and Education, 26).
  • Hellinger, Marlies; Bußmann, Hadumod (Hg.) (2002): Gender Across Languages: The Linguistic Representation of Women and Men (2).
  • Höhenrieder, Brigitte (2004): Wie chinesisch ist das Chinesische? Shen Xiaolong und die Kulturlinguistik. Frankfurt am Main: Lang (Europäische HochschulschriftenReihe 21, Linguistik, 267).
  • Hong, Wei (1993): A Cross-Cultural Study of Requests in Chinese and German. Ph.D. dissertation. Purdue University.
  • Hong, Wei (1997): Gender differences in Chinese request patterns. In: Journal of Chinese Linguistics (25.2), S. 193–210.
  • Hong, Wei (1997): Language change in Chinese: evidence from the service industry. In: Linguistische Berichte (167), S. 23–31.
  • Hong, Wei (1997): Sociopragmatics in language teaching: with examples of Chinese requests. In: Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 32 (1), S. 95–107.
  • Hong-Fincher, Beverly (1985): Politeness in Chinese: impersonal pronouns and personal greetings. In: Anthropological Linguistics (27.2), S. 204–213.
  • Hong-Fincher, Beverly (1987): Indications of the changing status of women in Modern Standard Chinese terms of address. Pacific Linguistics C-100. In: D. C. Laycock und W. Winter (Hg.): A World of Language: Papers Presented to Professor S.A. Wurm on his 65th Birthday, S. 265–273.
  • Hong-Fincher, Beverly (1992): Mrs., Miss and Madam: how to address Chinese women in polite circles. Pacific Linguistics C-110. In: Tom Dutton, Malcom Ross und Darrell Tryon (Hg.): The Language Game: Papers in Memory of Donald C. Laycock. Series Pacific Linguistics: Dept. of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific Studies, the Australian National University, S. 179–185.
  • Hu, Mingyang (1991): Feminine accent in the Beijing vernacular: a sociolinguistic investigation. In: Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association XXVI, S. 49–54.
  • Ingulsrud, John E.; Allen, Kate (1999): Learning to read in China. Sociolinguistic perspectives on the acquisition of literacy. Lewiston, N.Y: E. Mellen Press.
  • Jernudd, Bjorn H.; Yan, Yan; Yue, Eleanor (1995): A secret language in Hong Kong. Cantonese secret language used by girls in a secondary school in Hong Kong. In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale (24), S. 155–166.
  • Ji, Fengyuan (2003): Linguistic Engineering: Language and Politics in Maos China: University of Hawaii Press. Online verfügbar unter http://www.lob.de/cgi-bin/work/suche2?titnr=221679679&flag=citavi.
  • Kuo, Jenny Yi-Chun (2016): Mandarin development of Indonesian immigrants‘ children. A longitudinal study in Taiwan.
  • Liang, Sihua (2015): Language Attitudes and Identities in Multilingual China. A Linguistic Ethnography: Springer. Online verfügbar unter http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12619-7.
  • Liao, Chao-chih (廖招治) (1994): A Study on the Strategies, Maxims, and Development of Refusal in Mandarin Chinese. Taipei: The Crane Publishing Co., Ltd.
  • Liao, Chao-chih (廖招治) (1997): Comparing Directives: American English, Mandarin and Taiwanese English. Taipei: The Crane Publishing Co., Ltd.
  • Liu, Fei-wen (1997): Nüzi (Female Script), Nüshu (Female Literature), Nüge (Female Songs) and Peasant Women’s De-Silencing of Themselves, Jiangyong County, Hunan Province, China. Ph.D. dissertation. Syracuse University.
  • Liu, Jin; Tao, Hongyin (Hg.) (2012): Chinese under globalization. Emerging trends in language use in China: World Scientific Press.
  • Lui, Fei-wen (2015): Gendered words. Sentiments and expression in changing rural China. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Lung, Wai-chu Rachel (龍惠珠) (1997): Xianggang nanxing-nüxing dui Putonghuade taidu“ (香港男性女性對普通話的態度). Sex differences in attitudes towards Putonghua in Hong Kong. In: Chinese Language Review (Hong Kong) (53), S. 78–79.
  • Michel, Véronique; Müller, Claude; Koval, Sébastien; Lobo, Marcio (2015): China online. Netspeak and wordplay used by over 700 million Chinese Internet users: Tuttle Publishing.
  • Pan, Yuling (1995): Power behind linguistic behavior: analysis of politeness phenomena in Chinese official settings. Cantonese dialect data. In: Journal of Language and Social Psychology (14), S. 462–481.
  • Shen Xiaolong (1990): Zhongguo wenhua yuyanxue 中国文化语言学. Changchun.
  • Shi, Jinbo; Bin; Bai; Zhao, Liming (史金波 白濱 趙麗明 主編) (1995): Qitede Nüshu: Quanguo Nüshu Xueshu Kaocha Yantaohui Wenji (奇特的女書: 全國女書學術考察研討會文集. The Mystery of Nü Shu — The Women’s Script. Beijing: Beijing Yuyan Xueyuan Chubanshe.
  • Shih, Yu-huei (施玉惠) (1984): Cong shehui yuyanxue guandian tantao Zhongwen nannü liangxing yuyande chayi“ (從社會語言學觀點探討中文男女兩性語言的差異. A sociolinguistic study of male-female differences in Chinese. In: Jiaoxue yu Yanjiu (6), S. 207–229.
  • Cathy (1994): From daughter to daughter-in-law in the women’s script of Southern Hunan. 1994. In: Christina K. Gilmartin (Hg.): Engendering China: Women, Culture, and the State. Harvard Contemporary China Series 10.
  • Su, Hsi-Yao (2008): What does it mean to be a girl with qizhi?: Refinement, gender and language ideologies in contemporary Taiwan. In: Journal of Sociolinguistics (12/3), S. 334–358.
  • Sung, Margaret (1981): Chinese personal naming. In: Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association (16), S. 67–90.
  • Tan, Dali (1990): Sexism in the Chinese language. In: ournal of the National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA) (2.4), S. 635–639.
  • Tang, Ting-chi (湯廷池) (1988): Guoyu cihuide ‚zhongnan qingnü‘ xianxiang“ (國語詞匯的「重男輕女」現象). The phenomenon of stressing the importance of males and treating light the females in the Chinese lexicon. In: Tingchi Tang und 湯廷池 (Hg.): Hanyu Cifa Jufa Lunji (漢語詞法句法論集. Taibei: Student Book Co.
  • Tsou, Benjamin K.Y (1981): A sociolinguistic analysis of the logographic writing system of Chinese. In: Journal of Chinese Lanugage Teachers Association 9 (1-19).
  • Uytanlet, Juliet Lee (2016): The Hybrid Tsinoys. Challenges of Hybridity and Homogeneity as Sociocultural Constructs among the Chinese in the Philippines: Pickwick Publications. Online verfügbar unter http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/gbv/detail.action?docID=4743619.
  • Watson, Rubie S. (1986): The named and the nameless: gender and person in Chinese society. In: American Ethnologist 13 (4), S. 619–631.
  • Wong, Andrew (2003): Tongzhi, Ideologies, and Semantic Change. Ph.D. dissertation. Stanford University.
  • Wong, Andrew (2005): The reappropriation of tongzhi. In: Language in Society 34 (5), S. 763–793.
  • Wong, Andrew (2008): On the actuation of semantic change: The case of tongzhi. In: Language Sciences (30), S. 423–449.
  • Wong, Andrew; Qing Zhang (2000): The linguistic construction of the tongzhi community. In: Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 10 (2), S. 248–278.
  • Xiao, Yun (2012): Chinese Language in the United States: An Ethnolinguistic Perspective. In: Linda T. H. Tsung und Ken Cruikshank (Hg.): Teaching and learning Chinese in global contexts. Multimodality and literacy in the new media age. London: Continuum, S. 181–196.
  • Xu, Dan (2012): Plurality and Classifiers across Languages in China. Aufl. s.l: Mouton de Gruyter (Trends in linguistics. Studies and monographs, 255). Online verfügbar unter http://www.degruyter.com/doi/book/10.1515/9783110293982.
  • Ye, Lei (1995): Complimenting in Mandarin Chinese. In: Pragmatics of Chinese as Native and Target Language, S. 207–302.
  • Zhan, Kaidi (1992): The Strategies of Politeness in the Chinese Language. Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies.
  • Zhang, Hong (1992): „Spare women a beating for three days, they will stand on the roof and tear the house apart“images of women in Chinese proverbs. In: Kira Hall, Mary Bucholtz, Moonwomon und Birch (Hg.): Locating Power: Proceedings of the Second Berkeley Women and Language Conference. Berkeley, S. 601–609.
  • Zhang, Qing (2000): Changing Economy, Changing Markets: A Sociolinguistic Study of Chinese Yuppies. Dissertation. Stanford University, Ph.D.
  • Zhang, Qing (2005): A Chinese yuppie in Beijing: Phonological variation and the construction of a new professional identity. In: Language in Society (34), S. 431–466.
  • Zhang, Qing (2008): Cosmopolitanism and linguistic capital in China: Language, gender and the transition to a globalized market economy in Beijing. In: Bonnie S. v. McElhinny (Hg.): Words, Worlds and Material Girls: Language, Gender, Global Economies. Reihe:Language, Power and Social Process [LPSP] 19: de Gruyter Mouton, S. 403–422.
  • Zhang, Qing (2008): Rhotacization and the Beijing smooth operator: The social meaning of a linguistic variable. In: Journal of Sociolinguistics (12), S. 201–222.
  • Zhou, Minglang (2006): Language planning and varieties of (modern standard) Chinese. Amsterdam: Benjamins.